NOTE: As of June 14, 2013, the Project HealthDesign website is now an archive and will not be updated regularly. Please feel free to use the site to learn about our work exploring the power and potential of personal health records. Direct any inquiries to info@projecthealthdesign.org.
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Team Biographies

dwellSense
Using Sensor Data from Elders' Daily Activities to Augment PHRs



Anind K. Dey, Ph.D.
Principal Investigator
Associate Professor, Human-Computer Interaction Institute
Carnegie Mellon University

Anind Dey is an associate professor in the Human-Computer Interaction Institute at Carnegie Mellon University. His interests lie at the intersection of human-computer interaction, machine learning and ubiquitous computing. He is a leading expert in context awareness and has spent the last decade developing techniques for building context-aware applications and for improving the usability of such applications. Dey has considerable experience in designing, implementing, deploying and evaluating innovative technical systems. This includes MemExerciser, a sensor-based tool for individuals with episodic memory impairment that captures an important event, filters the captured stream for the most salient details which are used as memory cues; a personal navigation system that learns the preferences of elder drivers by observing them drive and produces routes that match these preferences, and a system to explore privacy in such sensor-based applications.

Dey is the author of more than 100 articles on ubiquitous computing, has served as the program chair for several conferences on ubiquitous computing and serves on the editorial board for IEEE Pervasive Computing and Personal and Ubiquitous Computing Journal. Prior to joining the faculty at Carnegie Mellon University, Dey was a senior researcher at Intel Research Berkeley and an adjunct assistant professor at the University of California, Berkeley. He holds a doctorate and a master's in computer science, as well as a master's in aerospace engineering, all from Georgia Institute of Technology, and a bachelor's of computer engineering from Simon Fraser University.
 



Matthew Lee, B.A.
Lead Researcher
Ph.D. Student at the Human-Computer Interaction Institute
Carnegie Mellon University

Matthew Lee is a Ph.D. student at the Human-Computer Interaction Institute at Carnegie Mellon University. His research focuses on making sense of large amounts of sensor data, particularly to improve the quality of life of older adults and assist people with cognitive and physical disabilities. Lee's current research project is focused on investigating how to make sense of data from embedded assessment sensing technology to track how well older adults carry out everyday activities important for independence. Based on the needs of stakeholders (older adults, their family caregivers, and health care professionals), he develops systems that will create salient summaries of the data to assist the user in managing awareness of changes in functional abilities. Previously, Lee designed MemExerciser, a life-logging system to help people with Alzheimer's disease remember their experiences better and reduce the burden on their caregivers.
 



Linda Kent
Role: Recruitment, assessing functional abilities of individuals with disabilities, domain expert
Occupational Therapist Registered
Presbyterian SeniorCare

Linda Kent is a licensed occupational therapist with Presbyterian Seniorcare, and is an expert in the assessment of functional abilities within the geriatric population. She has worked in long-term care for 16 years in assisted living, independent living and skilled nursing environments. Kent has vast expertise in working with a range of cognitive (including Alzheimer’s disease and dementia) and physical disabilities.
 



Diane Collins, Ph.D.
Role: Recruitment, assessing functional abilities of individuals with disabilities, domain expert
Assistant Professor, Occupational Therapist Registered/Licensed
University of Pittsburgh, Rehabilitation Science and Technology

Diane Collins is an expert in assessing the functional abilities of individuals with disabilities. As a trained and licensed occupational therapist, she has more than 20 years of clinical experience. Her recent research has focused on assessing changes in functional and physical characteristics in nursing homes in order to prevent falls and related injuries. Collins played an instrumental role in designing a nursing home sensor kiosk than collects frequent, consistent data about many physical and emotional factors that may lead to increased risks of falls. She has also worked extensively with people with cognitive and physical disabilities in her research in wheelchair use and is also responsible for teaching disability sensitivity training to thousands of employees of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Collins holds a doctorate in rehabilitation science and technology, a master's in management and a bachelor's in occupational therapy.
 



Pamela Toto, Ph.D., OTR/L, BCG
Role: Assessing functional abilities of elders
Assistant Professor, Occupational Therapist Registered/Licensed
University of Pittsburgh, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences

 
Project HealthDesign is a national program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation